0
0
0
s2sdefault

Behavioral and nicotine replacement therapies offered together can help people who are incarcerated quit smoking, according to Rutgers researchers. "Smokers who are incarcerated, similar to other marginalized populations who smoke, lack the necessary skills to quit and have limited access to treatment options," said Pamela Valera, an assistant professor in the Department of Urban-Global Public Health at the Rutgers School of Public Health. "Without smoke cessation resources and treatment, only 5 percent of those who quit will achieve long-term success."