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Twenty-nine per cent of health professionals would not recommend e-cigarettes to cancer patients who already smoke, according to research presented at the 2018 NCRI Cancer Conference. The study was presented by Dr. Jo Brett, [...] She said: "Smoking is a well-established risk factor for many common cancers. It is the single biggest avoidable cause of cancer in the world. "Problems caused by smoking continue after a cancer diagnosis. [...]

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Leading e-cigarette companies have admitted in meetings with the Food and Drug Administration that vape flavorings appeal to kids, and suggested ways that the agency could regulate those products, according to an FDA statement [...]. But public health experts say not to expect the industry to come up with useful ways to police itself. After years of public health officials warning that young people were using e-cigarettes in alarming numbers, the FDA is crafting regulations to prevent kids and teens from vaping. [...]

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America’s slow burn towards cannabis legalisation continues at the midterms as four states will vote on ballots featuring medicinal and recreational initiatives. Michigan and North Dakota will decide whether to make the drug legal while Utah and Missouri will vote on its medicinal uses. Polls are suggesting that all four ballots are likely to pass.
With two-thirds of Americans now pro-legalisation, it's fair to say that attitudes have relaxed since the fears of 'Reefer Madness' in the late 1930s [...]

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New Health Canada figures say Canadians over 25 smoked more tobacco and cannabis last year than they did two years before.

Health Canada closely tracks trends in tobacco, alcohol and drug use among Canadians 15 and older to help develop policies and programs.

The prevalence of cigarette smoking among those 25 and up was 16 per cent in 2017, an increase from 13 per cent two years earlier. And 13 per cent of people aged 25 or older reported having used cannabis in the last year, up from 10 per cent in 2015.

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I was a smoker for over 10 years and I’m ashamed to say I absolutely loved it. After an unbelieveable amount of failed attempts, I was convinced that I would never give up smoking.

Sorrowfully, this is the shared reality of millions of Australians today, and hundreds of millions worldwide. Many of these people have shared their stories and cries for help only to be ignored and shut down by misleading headlines, manifesting into false opinions by the miscreant policy-makers whose ‘personal opinions’ are preached as gospel [...]

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Even as more and more American quit smoking cigarettes, individuals with serious psychological distress (SPD) are much less likely to extinguish their habit. A new study [...] found that individuals with mental health problems quit cigarettes at half the rate of those without psychological distress. "Overall, tobacco cessation programs have been very successful, but our research suggests that people with mental health problems have not benefitted from these," said Renee Goodwin [...] senior author.

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The tobacco giant behind brands such as Lambert & Butler will seek to show investors this week that its portfolio of vaping products is winning over ex-smokers.

Imperial Brands has already said it hopes to make a profit from so-called “next generation products” (NGPs) by next year, as sales of traditional tobacco products continue to decline. The FTSE 100 company is due to release results for the year to September on Tuesday, [...]

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Children are using e-cigarettes at epidemic levels — and the Food and Drug Administration is going into crisis mode to address the problem.

The FDA announced Tuesday it will unveil “forceful” steps in mid-November to cut down on youth use of e-cigarettes, potentially including increased enforcement of identification and age verification requirements. This comes after the agency issued a call to action in September to address the “alarming increase in youth use of e-cigarettes” and threatened to ban all flavored e-cigarettes.

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The Juul e-cigarette was created to help adult smokers quit, according to the company that makes it. Its developers wanted to make the experience of getting a stimulating hit of nicotine dramatically better than sucking on a stinky, smoking stick of burning tobacco. Their success made Juul the top-selling e-cigarette in the U.S. in two years, but it achieved that position in part by attracting a huge following among kids younger than 18, who aren’t legally allowed to purchase such products. [...]

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Thailand is hoping to become the first country in Asia to legalize medical marijuana and tap into the burgeoning cannabis market, Agence France-Presse reports.

According to a Thai official, a draft bill now under consideration proposes allowing marijuana for medicinal purposes, a considerable change in a country with tough drug trafficking laws.

Jet Sirathraanon, the pubic health committee chair of Thailand’s National Legislative Assembly, emphasized that marijuana would be legal “for medication only, not for recreation.” [...]

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Smoking hookah tobacco acutely impairs blood vessels' ability to function, according to preliminary research to be presented in Chicago at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2018. "Hookah is the only form of tobacco product that uses burning charcoal briquettes to heat the flavored tobacco in the waterpipe. So, in addition to toxic substances from tobacco and nicotine, hookah smoke exposes users to charcoal combustion products, including large amounts of carbon monoxide," said Mary Rezk-Hanna, Ph.D., study lead author [...]

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While cigarette prices will go up, it will not be so drastic as to make smokers turn to illicit cigarettes to satisfy their addiction, says Health Minister Datuk Seri Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad.

"In our assessment, we are not only looking at increasing duties but also the effect of taxation on illicit cigarettes.

"The lower income group will turn to illicit cigarattes if prices go up to a level where it becomes unaffordable to them," he said when replying a supplementary question raised by Wong Chen (PH-Subang) in Parliament on Wednesday (Oct 31).

 

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Results of a new study released Thursday by Massachusetts General Hospital demonstrated that marijuana impairs memory and learning in adolescents who were regular users. On the up side, the study also found that one month of abstinence by regular cannabis users led to improvement in the memory functions that are necessary for effective learning. The link between memory and learning is a more complicated than it looks at first. [...]

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Most research points to cigarette smoke, not nicotine, as being the primary contributor to cancer among smokers. However, although most experts agree that nicotine does not directly cause cancer, some research suggests that nicotine may lead to a type of DNA damage that increases the risk of cancer. Research from 2015 reported in the Indian Journal of Medical and Paediatric Oncology suggests that nicotine may increase the risk of cancer because it might damage DNA, initiate cancer and cause it to progress faster, and interact with cancer-causing chemicals.

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Lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in the country, and almost 90 percent of deaths from this disease are directly attributable to cigarette smoking. Many cancers, such as breast cancer, that were once a death sentence are now treatable, yet lung cancer survival rates remain below 20 percent. A cure may be elusive, but the medical community can stop this disease and eliminate most future lung cancer deaths.

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E-cigarettes should not be recommended for smoking cessation purposes as they increase the risk of heart attack, a study has warned.

Daily e-cigarette users were almost twice as likely to have a heart attack compared with those who had never used e-cigarettes, according to the research.

The findings come after a Government report released in August recommended that patients should switch to e-cigarettes if it was not possible to quit smoking altogether.

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A store that specializes in products intended to cut down the dangerous effects of smoking has been warned by Health Canada it must remove its signage because the agency categorizes them as tobacco products, which makes it illegal for them to advertise outwardly to the public.

The problem is, says Rothmans, Benson and Hedges, which produces IQOS — a device that heats a tobacco stick into vapour at 350 C, but not to the point where combustion will cause smoke — is their products fit more into the vaping category, where such companies can advertise.