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Filter interviewed nearly a dozen people currently operating in the newly burgeoning illicit vape markets in New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts, where versions of flavor bans have recently gone into effect, high excise taxes have been instituted and billions of dollars—at least according to one report out of Massachusetts—are already being generated in illegal transactions. Most requested anonymity for fear of legal repercussions. “This is the same kind of dumb failure that has led us into the War on Drugs.” One e-liquid manufacturer in New York State, who told Filter he acquired 10 gallons of liquid nicotine before the state ban became a reality, just leased a new property to produce and sell his homemade flavors to his hundreds of established customers. “I’m set for a few years,” he claimed.

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“It’s good news the Minister of Finance didn’t use this Budget to hike tobacco tax, as has been the case for the past four years,” said Nancy Loucas, Director of Aotearoa Vapers Community Advocacy (AVCA). Loucas believes that while tobacco tax is used as a way of gaining revenue, it has a negative impact on vulnerable groups and does little to motivate the public to quit smoking. “AVCA does not support tobacco tax hikes. Too often they’ve been used as a revenue gathering exercise and always hit the vulnerable the hardest. They’re terribly regressive and (...)"

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In Great Britain, more than half (52.7%) of people aged 16 years and above who currently smoked said they wanted to quit, and 62.5% of those who have ever smoked said they had quit, based on our estimates from the Opinions and Lifestyle Survey (OPN). In the UK, in 2019, 14.1% of people aged 18 years and above smoked cigarettes, which equates to around 6.9 million people in the population, based on our estimate from the Annual Population Survey (APS) (...)

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Hundreds of thousands of Australians who import liquid nicotine from overseas have won a six-month reprieve from tough new rules that would have put them at risk of hefty fines, but the battle over vaping is far from over. Australian Border Force was preparing to seize liquid nicotine imported without a GP's prescription, after the Therapeutic Goods Administration moved to close a loophole that allowed the product to be bought online from overseas and mixed with flavoured vape juice. The tough new regime, under which offenders could be fined up to $200,000, was due to commence on July 1 but (...)

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Evidence collected over the last decade indicates that flavors are essential for adults looking to use vaping products to quit smoking. Indeed, a new study published finds flavored vapor products to be more effective than tobacco-flavored e-cigarettes in helping adults remain smoke-free. A new study published by JAMA Network Open examines the role of flavors in electronic cigarettes and vapor products and their influence on subsequent smoking initiation and cessation by both youth and adults. The use of flavored e-cigarettes was associated with more than twice the odds of (...)

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Tobacco Intelligence managing news editor David Palacios joins Jon Bruford to discuss the implications and impact of the looming Tobacco Products Directive version 3 on the industry (...)

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In an exercise of transparency, EUobserver filed a freedom of information request to get insights into an internal debate on e-cigarettes at the European Parliament. The issue revolves around the possibility of setting up specialised booths at parliament premises for MEPs who vape. Vaping is banned at the parliament, outside designated areas for cigarettes. Some MEPs are now demanding four new specialised booths for e-cigarette smokers in Brussels and in Strasbourg, an issue being debated among all the quaestors in charge of running day to day affairs. Polish conservative MEP Karol Karski, who is one of the European Parliament's handful of quaestors, is also supporting a proposal to (...)

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The Australian Department of Health has halted a ban on importing nicotine liquids into Australia. The ban was set to come into force from July 1 and would prevent the import of e-cigarettes and nicotine refills for an initial 12-month period with possible penalties of up to $220,000. Commenting UKVIA Director John Dunne said, ‘We welcome the decision by the Australian government to delay this ban and would call on them to reverse it completely in the next six months. “In the UK the clear advice from health authorities, including Public Health England, is that e-cigarettes can be an effective aid to stopping smoking and staying smokefree. It is clear that vaping is far less harmful to the respiratory system than smoking.

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The state Senate Ways and Means Committee on Thursday unanimously advanced a bill banning flavored tobacco products. House Bill 2457, known as the Reversing the Youth Tobacco Epidemic Act of 2020, would prohibit the sale or distribution of all flavored tobacco products in the state. In 2009, the federal Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act prohibited flavors, including fruit and candy flavoring in cigarettes, but not for other smoking devices. The 2020 state Legislature is hoping to change that. The bill states that while there has been a decline in the use of cigarettes during the past decade, there has been a dramatic increase in (...)

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Is Big Tobacco big enough to beat COVID-19? The properties of the tobacco plant have been well known among researchers for decades, earning it the nickname “the lab mouse of the plant world.” Plant-based vaccines can copy viruses, allowing the body’s immune system to recognize them and create an immune response. Kentucky BioProcessing (KBP), a subsidiary of British American Tobacco, might seem a surprising contender for a COVID-19 vaccine, but it’s working on one using tobacco plants. And it’s not the first time. They played a key role in developing one of the most successful antidotes to the Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo. “The technologies and processes that KBP develops make it possible to (...)

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Sales of cigarettes are doing a little better this year than any of the industry players expected. By way of background, at one point in the late 1960s, nearly half of American adults smoked. With a greater awareness of the high health risks, stricter regulations arrived, causing a slow-but-steady decline in smoking prevalence. Since the early 1980s, cigarettes have been a melting ice cube, with volumes declining at an average clip of 3% to 4% annually. Coming into 2020, the major U.S. tobacco players all expected industry volumes to drop in the 4% to 6% range, another year of above-average decline. Then the pandemic hit, and unemployment skyrocketed. Covid-19 is specifically dangerous for smokers, says the CDC, given (...)

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After a decade of legal challenges by the tobacco lobby, Australia’s pioneering push to eliminate all tobacco advertising finally has clear air. Its longest stoush, over plain packaging laws introduced in 2012, finally ended last month, when the highest adjudicative body of the Word Trade Organisation affirmed a 2018 ruling the laws did not constitute an effective trade barrier or infringe tobacco companies’ trade mark rights. This is a significant win. But the global war is far from over. While this decision should encourage more countries to introduce plain packaging, the tobacco lobby can still be expected to use legal chicanery to thwart such public health measures.

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today authorized the marketing of IQOS, Philip Morris International’s (PMI) electrically heated tobacco system, as a modified risk tobacco product (MRTP). In doing so, the agency found that an IQOS exposure modification order is appropriate to promote the public health. Today’s decision demonstrates that IQOS is a fundamentally different tobacco product and a better choice for adults who would otherwise continue smoking. IQOS is the first and only (...)

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Just a few years ago, e-cigarettes were lauded as a public-health miracle that could wean addicts off of far more harmful smoking habits. Today, the same e-cigarettes are denounced as a public-health nightmare, and their sale is increasingly restricted. How did this happen? And which view is more right? Guest Sally Satel joins us to tell a story of tone-deaf manufacturers, flawed regulation, media scare-mongering, and an extraordinary (...)

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Many factors lead to the commencement and maintenance of smoking, and better understanding of these is relevant in the management of oral health, particularly as smoking cessation advice (SCA) from the dental team is a key component of patient care. Whereas most previous research has focused on dental professionals’ perceptions of providing SCA, and identified facilitators and barriers to its provision, there has been more limited research focusing on patients’ perceptions of receiving SCA in the dental context. Accordingly, this study aimed to explore the views of smokers with periodontitis receiving dentist‐delivered SCA.

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An employee of the magazine PR Week has been happy to trot out another unwarranted attack on the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World (FSFW), courtesy of the “tobacco industry watchdog”, Stopping Tobacco Organizations and Products (STOP). STOP, synonymous with the University of Bath’s ‘Tobacco Tactics’, is part of a coordinated approach to undermine tobacco harm reduction (THR) through slur and innuendo rather than address the actual science.
Bloomberg’s money works hard at STOP. Recently, one of the researchers at Bath contacted the Planet of the Vapes forum in order to gain assistance with “research”. The latest attack says that the World Health Organization is “concerned” by a “Big Tobacco-funded aggressive PR effort” during the current COVID-19 pandemic. They claim the FSFW is pulling strings in order to get its minions to conduct “research on tobacco users”. (...) STOP says FSFW funds “VIDA News to ‘increase public awareness of the drivers of smoking harm and the availability of alternatives’ [and] the International Network of Nicotine Consumer Organisations (INNCO) to ‘promote tobacco harm-reduction on the global stage’.”

 

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In another step to tighten the regulation of sin products, the Department of Finance (DOF) may ban the online sale of cigarettes and alcoholic beverages. In a text message to reporters, Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez said the DOF may ban the sale of cigarettes and alcohol in online spaces where it is hard to ensure that they are not being sold to minors. “We will move to ban online sales of cigarettes and liquor,” Dominguez said. The proposal comes at a time when more Filipinos are using online transactions to buy products, especially with community quarantines in place to contain the COVID-19 outbreak.

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The Coalition of Asia Pacific Tobacco Harm Reduction Advocates (Caphra) is supporting a petition by the Taiwan Tobacco Harm Reduction Association (TTHRA), urging the government of Taiwan to allow tobacco harm reduction products, such as e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, as part of the key strategy to decrease national smoking rates. Caphra’s executive coordinator Nancy Loucas, said that this request is in line with the WHO’s recommendation that countries regulate safer alternatives to protect public health. “This aligns with the WHO declaration that health is a (...)

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Chinese e-cigarette and vape manufacturer Smoore International 6969.HK, one of the largest companies of its kind in the world, has raised $918 million (£734.93 million) after pricing its shares at HK$12.40 each in its Hong Kong initial public offering (IPO), according two sources with direct knowledge of the matter. The Shenzhen-based company offered 574 million shares, according to the company’s prospectus, and had (...)

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Nearly 20 percent of survivors of smoking-related cancers continued to smoke even after recovery, according to a study published Thursday by JAMA Network Open. The percentage was far greater among survivors of all types of cancer who had been smokers. More than half -- 56 percent -- remained active smokers, they said. "The percentage of current smokers among smoking-related cancer survivors was substantially higher than that in the general population of about 14 percent," study co-author Sanjay Shete told UPI.