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Popular e-cigarette manufacturer Juul is one of the fastest growing vaping companies around. It has been targeting youngsters and adolescents with their flavoured e-cigarettes. The company has recently come under scrutiny for steadily raising the nicotine content of its e-cigarettes.

A report stating the rise of nicotine in Juul’s e-cigarettes and its impact on other vaping companies was published in the latest issue of the BMJ journal Tobacco Control in a study titled, “Nicotine arms race: JUUL and the high-nicotine product market.” [...]

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If you’re walking down the street or are out and about...you see fewer people having a “bunger”, a dart, a cigarette, right? Strong anti-smoking campaigns in Australia are working, but smoking is still a massive killer. [...] Aaron Kearney speaks with the co-deputy director of the Hunter Cancer Research Alliance and HMRI professor Christine Paul and Conjoint Associate Professor Colin Mendelsohn from the University of NSW who is also the Chair of the Australian Tobacco Harm Reduction Association.

 

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s2smodern

Global tobacco companies should be paying more UK corporation tax, according to a report that claims they are not contributing their fair share despite making massive profits.

Academics at the University of Bath found that the four largest cigarette companies pay hundreds of millions of pounds in tax overseas but consistently pay less than the headline rate of UK corporation tax.

The companies, which disputed the report’s findings, include Gauloises-maker Imperial Brands and British American Tobacco (BAT), owner of Camel and Lucky Strike.

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s2smodern

Rampant misinformation is a massive problem for the vaping industry. You don’t have to look very far to find a report which claims to put the nail in the coffin for vaping, only for the report to be woefully misguided or even blatantly biased. This is why it’s always so important to do your own research before believing anything you hear. A lot of people don’t follow this simple rule, however, so it’s no wonder why public perception to the benefits of vaping remains as low as 13%. [...]

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s2smodern

The Akay Lab biomedical research team at the University of Houston is reporting in the journal Nature Scientific Reports that a possible cure for addiction may be found by following the pathways of significantly altered dopamine neurons in newborns who were chronically exposed to nicotine in utero. The findings of the altered neurons come from recordings of dopamine and non-dopamine neurons in the brain's addiction center, called the ventral tegmental area (VTA), following chronic nicotine exposure during pregnancy.

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s2smodern

Health Canada is proposing new restrictions on advertising vaping products and e-cigarettes to minors, citing concerns about the products’ rising popularity among teens.

The proposed regulations, which have yet to be finalized, restrict advertising where youth might see it. This means not allowing advertisements at points of sale where youth are allowed access — including online. It would also remove ads from public places like malls, billboards and public transit.

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The study, conducted among almost 900 smokers in England, compared e-cigs and nicotine replacement therapy (patches, gum, etc.) to discover whether vaping is helpful for cigarette cessation. The answer, unequivocally, was yes. The study found e-cigs to be roughly twice as likely to help cigarette smokers to quit as NRT. The figures were still relatively low—with 18 percent of smokers who switched to e-cigs remaining smoke-free after one year, versus 10 percent for NRT. [...]

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s2smodern

Hawaii is considering laws which would incrementally raise the legal age at which you can smoke, until only those aged over 100 can buy cigarettes.

Democratic state representative Richard Creagan’s proposed legislation would effectively ban the sale of cigarettes on Hawaii, and if adopted it would become the first US state to do so. Currently Hawaiians must be 21 in order to buy cigarettes, but under the proposals, the age would rise to 30 in 2020, 40 in 2021, 50 in 2022, 60 in 2023, and then jump from 60 to 100 in 2024.

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s2smodern

The debate over vaping has been going for over a decade now, but in the last few years, things have gotten particularly contentious. Those against vaping firmly believe accepting e-cigarettes for their harm reduction and smoking cessation benefits could increase the number of smokers, despite any evidence supporting these claims. Supporters of e-cigarettes instead focus on the growing pile of peer-reviewed evidence which suggests vaping has a ton to offer smokers. [...]

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s2smodern

According to the headline of a UPI news story from last week, vaping has been linked to an increased risk of having a heart attack. [...] It is irresponsible to use the results of this cross-sectional study to conclude (or even suggest) that e-cigarette use increases heart attack or stroke risk. Why? Because the study only assessed the relationship between "ever" having used e-cigarettes and "ever" having had a heart attack. [...]

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s2smodern

My point is, we do not need nor should we rely on a government regulator to pronounce that the sky is blue or the grass is green. These are distinctions individuals can make based on inherent understanding; much like the understanding that if something does not burn it cannot produce smoke. A fact wired into our DNA some 400,000 years ago when Man (poke) discovered fire.

Sadly, the forces behind the war on vaping will not let something so trivial as the facts to get in the way of their plans to keep the spigot flowing with big tobacco’s billion-dollar annual payoff. [...]

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'Heat not burn' or 'heated tobacco' products are electronic devices that, unlike e-cigarettes, contain tobacco leaf and heat it to a high temperature, without setting it alight. This difference is important. Because the devices contain tobacco, they come with all the long-term health concerns of tobacco. [...] Dr. Ed Stephens, a researcher at the University of St Andrews, whose work has compared the health impact of tobacco, e-cigarettes and heat not burn products, to find out more.

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[...] we ask Dr. Lion Shahab, one of the UK's leading experts on e-cigarettes and smoking, about the safety of e-cigarettes, or vaping, in comparison to smoking cigarettes.

Are e-cigarettes healthier than cigarettes?
Yes. Growing consensus suggests that e-cigarettes confer no more than 5% of the health risks associated with smoking. This is primarily due to the fact that e-cigarettes do not involve combustion which leads to the formation of harmful toxic and cancer-causing compounds.

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s2smodern

A Hawaii lawmaker has proposed a bill that would gradually raise the minimum smoking age to 100, which could effectively make Hawaii the first state to outlaw the sale of cigarettes.

“The state is obliged to protect the public’s health,” State House member Rep. Richard Creagan told the Hawaii Tribune-Herald.

“We, as legislators, have a duty to do things to save people’s lives,” he said. “If we don’t ban cigarettes, we are killing people.”

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s2smodern

Teenage use of electronic cigarettes (EC) has reached epidemic proportions. In 2011, fewer than 3 percent of high school seniors used ECs. In the past 12 months the number has increased to 37 percent, up from 28 percent in 2017. The epidemic has been fueled by the Juul, a stylish EC that has captured more than 70 percent of the market. The Juul company is being investigated for aggressively promoting to teenagers. Even if it stops, the damage has been done, Juul’s wild popularity will continue to addict teenagers.

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s2smodern

India’s plans to regulate internet content have put its vaping community at loggerheads with its government.

The country’s ministry of electronics and IT proposed changes to India’s Information Technology (IT) Act last December that would require web platforms like Facebook, WhatsApp, and Twitter to remove online content that promotes Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS). As a category, ENDS includes e-cigarettes and other methods of vaping, and currently occupies a legal grey area in India.

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The European Commission is “reluctant” to sit with the tobacco industry at the same table to discuss novel tobacco products such as e-cigarettes, a high-ranking EU official has said.

E-cigarettes may be less harmful, according to some reports, but they’re still “poison,” said Arūnas Vinčiūnas, [...] Asked why the Commission had systematically refused to meet with tobacco industry representatives during the current term, Vinčiūnas replied:

“There is reluctance and a specific attitude towards the tobacco industries,” which does not exist with other sectors.

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s2smodern

Of all the things you can die from, smoking ranks at the top of the list as far as preventable deaths go, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency's findings show that smoking-related deaths are responsible for about one in five deaths every year. There is some good news here, though, because the number of people who smoke cigarettes is on the decline.

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India’s ministry of electronics and information technology (MeitY) is likely to walk back the stance on vaping laid out as part of its proposed rules for policing internet content.

This follows submissions made by India’s fledgling vaping community that using e-cigarettes is not as harmful as smoking or chewing tobacco, and therefore should not be included in the rules. ”We do not, in fact, understand vaping and ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems). 

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SMOKING IS an unmitigated public-health horror. But is vaping? Just when the case against e-cigarettes seemed to be growing stronger by the day, a new study presents a more complicated public-health picture: They seem to be bad for some but good for others. The study, published last week in the New England Journal of Medicine, followed 886 British smokers seeking government help to quit.

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