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Hundreds of thousands of Australians who import liquid nicotine from overseas have won a six-month reprieve from tough new rules that would have put them at risk of hefty fines, but the battle over vaping is far from over. Australian Border Force was preparing to seize liquid nicotine imported without a GP's prescription, after the Therapeutic Goods Administration moved to close a loophole that allowed the product to be bought online from overseas and mixed with flavoured vape juice. The tough new regime, under which offenders could be fined up to $200,000, was due to commence on July 1 but (...)

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Alongside the physical event, the 2020 IECIE Shenzhen eCig expo will also be featuring an iconic new virtual expo, and both will be taking place between the 20th and 22nd of August. The organisers of the IECIE Shenzhen eCig expo, Informa Markets Creative, have decided to reschedule the physical expo to 20-22 August 2020, and feature alongside it a new virtual expo IECIE international eCig Virtual Expo, also held at the same time. Besides the travel limitations still in place due to Covid-19, the virtual expo will also attract vapers who for reasons or others are unable to travel, and would normally miss such an event. The IECIE International eCig Virtual Expo is in fact estimated to attract 10,000 e-cig users worldwide and give the opportunity to over 2500 vape exhibitors to engage in business virtually through any device.

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Tobacco Intelligence managing news editor David Palacios joins Jon Bruford to discuss the implications and impact of the looming Tobacco Products Directive version 3 on the industry (...)

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Australia is set to all but ban liquid nicotine for vaping, except for those with a prescription, so from January 1st, 2021 individuals will face huge fines for attempting to import liquid nicotine. But one prominent health professional says the ban ignores a range of potential benefits of vaping nicotine - specifically for the more than two million Australians who smoke cigarettes. Dr Alex Wodak is a member of the Australian Tobacco Harm Reduction Association and a Emeritus Consultant, at St Vincent's Hospital Alcohol and Drug Service, in Sydney.

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The Australian Department of Health has halted a ban on importing nicotine liquids into Australia. The ban was set to come into force from July 1 and would prevent the import of e-cigarettes and nicotine refills for an initial 12-month period with possible penalties of up to $220,000. Commenting UKVIA Director John Dunne said, ‘We welcome the decision by the Australian government to delay this ban and would call on them to reverse it completely in the next six months. “In the UK the clear advice from health authorities, including Public Health England, is that e-cigarettes can be an effective aid to stopping smoking and staying smokefree. It is clear that vaping is far less harmful to the respiratory system than smoking.

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It’s not news that smoking is bad for human health and the leading risk factor for many heart problems and cancers. It also reduces immunity, and makes people more likely to respiratory infections. But researchers have found recently that smokers might not be more susceptible to infection or illness caused by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). However, according to Riccardo Polosa, Professor of Internal Medicine at Italy’s University of Catania and a world-renowned researcher into tobacco harm reduction, there is still an area of active research and the jury remains out on the claims. Polosa sat down with Daily News Egypt to talk further on this critical issue. As with any viral infection, the symptoms and severity of symptoms generally depend on two key factors: the viral load and the (...)

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Is Big Tobacco big enough to beat COVID-19? The properties of the tobacco plant have been well known among researchers for decades, earning it the nickname “the lab mouse of the plant world.” Plant-based vaccines can copy viruses, allowing the body’s immune system to recognize them and create an immune response. Kentucky BioProcessing (KBP), a subsidiary of British American Tobacco, might seem a surprising contender for a COVID-19 vaccine, but it’s working on one using tobacco plants. And it’s not the first time. They played a key role in developing one of the most successful antidotes to the Ebola virus in the Democratic Republic of Congo. “The technologies and processes that KBP develops make it possible to (...)

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Does the endgame mean the end of tobacco and nicotine use? Or is the endgame, as I believe, the final stages of a transition—a shift from an unsustainable to a sustainable nicotine market? At the heart of this question is a fundamental confusion about the public health aims for tobacco and nicotine policy. This dispute is rarely surfaced and never resolved but confronting it has now become unavoidable. At least five objectives can be identified in tobacco control (...)

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After a decade of legal challenges by the tobacco lobby, Australia’s pioneering push to eliminate all tobacco advertising finally has clear air. Its longest stoush, over plain packaging laws introduced in 2012, finally ended last month, when the highest adjudicative body of the Word Trade Organisation affirmed a 2018 ruling the laws did not constitute an effective trade barrier or infringe tobacco companies’ trade mark rights. This is a significant win. But the global war is far from over. While this decision should encourage more countries to introduce plain packaging, the tobacco lobby can still be expected to use legal chicanery to thwart such public health measures.

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India’s eminent harm reduction advocate Samrat Chowdhery has been appointed as the President of the International Network of Nicotine Consumer Organizations (INNCO), a global body of 34 national advocacy groups which has been recognized with UN observer status. INNCO represents consumers of low-risk, alternative nicotine products, and promotes tobacco harm reduction (THR) at the global stage. The organization actively works on engaging consumers in the global THR discussions. In the process, it develops and strengthens member organizations of the community.

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Just a few years ago, e-cigarettes were lauded as a public-health miracle that could wean addicts off of far more harmful smoking habits. Today, the same e-cigarettes are denounced as a public-health nightmare, and their sale is increasingly restricted. How did this happen? And which view is more right? Guest Sally Satel joins us to tell a story of tone-deaf manufacturers, flawed regulation, media scare-mongering, and an extraordinary (...)

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While it may appear the Government is working in favour of vape users, a closer look at their planned restrictions reveals the opposite, writes Chris Mordd Richards. Vapers – the vast majority who used it or are using it as a method to quit traditional forms of smoking – rightly panicked and flooded suppliers with orders, selling out many popular providers, especially in New Zealand. Four days after the initial announcement, the health minister publicly backed down. The vapers had won, essentially nothing more to see here. That is according to at least one politician and at least one New Zealand vaping supplier, among others declaring an outright win. So why is everyone declaring victory suddenly?

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An employee of the magazine PR Week has been happy to trot out another unwarranted attack on the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World (FSFW), courtesy of the “tobacco industry watchdog”, Stopping Tobacco Organizations and Products (STOP). STOP, synonymous with the University of Bath’s ‘Tobacco Tactics’, is part of a coordinated approach to undermine tobacco harm reduction (THR) through slur and innuendo rather than address the actual science.
Bloomberg’s money works hard at STOP. Recently, one of the researchers at Bath contacted the Planet of the Vapes forum in order to gain assistance with “research”. The latest attack says that the World Health Organization is “concerned” by a “Big Tobacco-funded aggressive PR effort” during the current COVID-19 pandemic. They claim the FSFW is pulling strings in order to get its minions to conduct “research on tobacco users”. (...) STOP says FSFW funds “VIDA News to ‘increase public awareness of the drivers of smoking harm and the availability of alternatives’ [and] the International Network of Nicotine Consumer Organisations (INNCO) to ‘promote tobacco harm-reduction on the global stage’.”

 

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JUUL and similar pod-based e-cigarettes’ efficient delivery of nicotine may foster greater dependence than other types of e-cigarettes, according to a new study by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The pod-based e-cigarettes have been popular with teenagers and young adults since they came on the market in 2015, but little has been known about their health effects. A new systematic review led by researchers at the Harvard Chan School found that while the products may contain lower levels of harmful ingredients than conventional cigarettes, there is no evidence that even these lower levels are safe for youth. This is the first paper to synthesize research findings on (...)

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The Coalition of Asia Pacific Tobacco Harm Reduction Advocates (Caphra) is supporting a petition by the Taiwan Tobacco Harm Reduction Association (TTHRA), urging the government of Taiwan to allow tobacco harm reduction products, such as e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, as part of the key strategy to decrease national smoking rates. Caphra’s executive coordinator Nancy Loucas, said that this request is in line with the WHO’s recommendation that countries regulate safer alternatives to protect public health. “This aligns with the WHO declaration that health is a (...)

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Nicotine use rights and having the ability to have access to risk-reduced products as an alternative to cigarettes should be a no-brainer for the country’s so-called world-renowned tobacco control efforts. It’s ironic, though, that even when delays in policy are announced, you still can expect the policies and programs to have a “soft launch” that can be felt almost immediately. In an ideal scenario, barring labelling and plain-packaging regulations, the best course of action would (...)

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Nearly 20 percent of survivors of smoking-related cancers continued to smoke even after recovery, according to a study published Thursday by JAMA Network Open. The percentage was far greater among survivors of all types of cancer who had been smokers. More than half -- 56 percent -- remained active smokers, they said. "The percentage of current smokers among smoking-related cancer survivors was substantially higher than that in the general population of about 14 percent," study co-author Sanjay Shete told UPI.

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The properties of the tobacco plant, or Nicotiana tabacum, have been well known among researchers for decades, earning it the nickname “the lab mouse of the plant world.” Plant-based vaccines can copy viruses, allowing the body’s immune system to recognize them and create an immune response. Kentucky BioProcessing (KBP), a subsidiary of British American Tobacco (BAT), might seem a surprising contender for a COVID-19 vaccine, but it’s working on one using tobacco plants. According to BAT, this method can reduce the time required to reproduce vaccines from several (...)

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In early June, Massachusetts’s ban on flavored e-cigarette products went into effect. Massachusetts is the first state to prohibit the retail sale of flavored vaping products and flavored tobacco products like menthol cigarettes. While flavored e-cig use is still allowed in a handful of state licensed “smoking bars,” products in those establishments are hit with a whopping 75 percent excise tax. Testimony in June at the Massachusetts Department of Revenue’s Illegal Tobacco Task Force reveals how flavored e-cig users are responding to the ban. The task force concluded the ban will lead to “an increase in smuggling activity and black-market sales.”

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The coronavirus pandemic could have been a chance for public health authorities and governments to promote tobacco harm reduction (THR). Instead, they resorted to well-known, tried-yet-unproven remedies, restricting sales channels or banning tobacco products altogether. Based on the assumption, not scientific evidence, that people who smoke or vape may be at greater risk for Covid-19, anti-tobacco campaigners considered the pandemic (...)