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Walmart said Wednesday that it will raise the minimum age to buy tobacco products and e-cigarettes at its U.S. stores to 21 amid growing pressure from regulators to cut tobacco sales and use among minors.

The world’s largest retailer also said it will also stop selling fruit and dessert flavored e-cigarettes, which critics say can hook teenagers on vaping. The new rules will take effect in July at all its 5,300 U.S. stores, including its Sam’s Club warehouse locations. [...]

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The three political parties who are part of a minority government coalition agreed to basic elements of a referendum to allow for the use, possession, sale and cultivation of cannabis for adults 20 and older, which is set to appear on New Zealand’s 2020 ballot. Justice Minister Andrew Little confirmed in a press release that the measure will be binding—meaning that if voters approve the measure, the government will be obliged to follow through on the voters’s will.
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Beverly Hills is considering outlawing the sale of all tobacco products, a move that would make the glamorous California city the first in the nation to enact such a ban.

A draft ordinance going before the Beverly Hills City Council on Tuesday evening would exempt three existing high-end cigar lounges.

A report prepared for the council cites the city’s advocacy of healthy living and outlines the extensive adverse effects of tobacco use.

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Hāpai te Hauora is calling for TV show, The Project, to seek expert advice on vaping before developing unhelpful media content. The Project released a poll last week to gauge perceptions on whether "parents would let their 16-year-old drink beer" and "whether they would let their 16-year-old vape". An overwhelming majority responded that they would rather let their kids drink than vape. Public health advocates believe this raises serious concerns on both the media’s role in generating constructive health debates and public misconceptions on both vaping and drinking.
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The vaping revolution took the world by surprise. Invented in China in 2006, the e-cigarette has caused massive declines in smoking in Britain — more than almost any other country — because of an early decision by the Cameron government to resist calls to ban it. It is the reason we have the lowest cigarette consumption per capita in the G7, and the second lowest in Europe, and one of the lowest incidences of lung cancer.

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The tobacco industry is one of the most toxic on the planet: many people die prematurely every year because of the effects of cigarette, cigar and pipe smoking and many more have reduced quality of life. For decades, the tobacco lobby spent billions of dollars around the world denying mounting medical evidence of the negative, often fatal, effects of smoking. [...] In South Africa, it is no different. In recent years, we have seen a battle by the local, supposedly legal, industry to mobilise public sentiment against the so-called pirate manufacturers.
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[...] a new report indicates that parents who vape are much more likely to attempt quitting than parents who only smoke. The report itself is mired with mixed results and reactions, with the authors seemingly more focused on the potential harm of vaping, instead of praising the harm reduction provided across the board. Regardless, this new report has made waves on both sides of the debate. Only time will tell if this latest report helps or further undermines the vaping industry. But many experts are optimistic the positive far outweighs the negative in this case.

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The licensing of electronic cigarettes and vapes with a 200 per cent tax drew mixed reactions from citizens and experts over the past few days. Up until the government announced in its official gazette last Wednesday that importing and selling electronic cigarettes is no longer prohibited, black market dealers sold them for five times their original price, according to Income and Sales Tax Department Director General Hussam Abu Ali.
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A push by makers of electronic cigarettes to raise nicotine levels in the European Union towards their far higher American levels is running into opposition, a senior executive at U.S. market leader Juul said on Tuesday.

 

But there is little sign in Europe of the kind of regulatory backlash seen in the United States over youth vaping, said Grant Winterton, EMEA president of Juul.

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As e-cigarettes gain fans, children may be losing out. New research suggests that vaping parents expose children to secondhand fumes that may be as harmful as tobacco smoke. Nearly 5% of U.S. adults living with children use e-cigarettes, according to the study. And many of those kids have asthma. "Although e-cigarette aerosols are commonly perceived to be harmless vapors, they contain numerous potentially harmful chemicals," said lead researcher Jenny Carwile.
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"Presented on April 11, 2019 at Nantucket High School, Christine Johnston of Springfield College discusses vaping/Juuling and other e-cigarettes, the risks associated with usage and the marketing tactics used to hook new and young users."

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Researchers from the University of Iowa, led by Dr. Wei Bao, an assistant professor of epidemiology, found that 14 percent of American women of reproductive age who are not pregnant smoke conventional cigarettes (the rolled tobacco kind). Compare that to just 8 percent of pregnant women who still smoke conventional cigarettes. But e-cigarette use among both pregnant and non-pregnant women of reproductive age is virtually identical.
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A new nicotine product is being launched tomorrow to make quitting smoking more attractive. The oral product called White Fox contains no tobacco and is about to be launched nationally with lots of interest among retailers. “If New Zealand is serious about making smoking history then it has to provide a wide range of appealing alternatives to cigarettes - White Fox is adding to the options,” said Miles Illemann of NZ Smokefree Tomorrow [...]

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A study by the World Health Organization shows the Philippines continues to have one of the highest rates of smoking in Asia despite the government’s efforts to get Filipinos to quit smoking. The Philippines is ranked in the top 15 countries worldwide with the highest burden of tobacco-related illnesses. The country loses nearly P270 million in tobacco-usage related costs, which includes healthcare and productivity loss from illnesses and mortality. More than 100,000 Filipinos die annually from smoking-related diseases, such as lung cancer and heart failure.
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More than half of Ohio’s population could become eligible for a medical marijuana card in June if the state approves five more ailments as qualifying conditions.

Among the proposed additions: depression and insomnia, which affect hundreds of thousands in the state. An advisory committee for the state's medical board began studying whether medical marijuana could help the ailments in January. The three other conditions being considered are anxiety, autism spectrum disorder and opioid use disorder, a formal term used for opioid addiction.

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Vaping is about to become a Government-recommended way for smokers to quit cigarettes. Despite being increasingly banned in public places, the use of e-cigarettes will soon be promoted as a safer alternative to smoking by the Ministry of Health. A campaign encouraging smokers, and particularly young Māori women, to make the switch will be launched in August and a New Zealand-specific website offering vaping information and tips will go live this month.
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The Michigan legislature is considering a bill that would ban e-cigarettes to anyone under 18-years-old.

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Quebec is within its rights to legislate on vaping, but a provision banning demonstrations of vaping products inside shops or specialized clinics goes too far, a Quebec judge has ruled.

In a judgment released Friday, the court also invalidated another section of the provincial law prohibiting the advertising of vaping products to smokers seeking to kick their habit. A legal challenge was brought by an association representing Quebec vape shops and the Canadian Vaping Association.

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Last week the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved IQOS, a device that delivers nicotine by heating, not burning, tobacco sticks with a ceramic blade to produce vapor—not smoke. The decision means that for the first time, a “heat-not-burn” (HNB) product will be sold in the US. However, the agency added: “While today’s action permits the tobacco products to be sold in the US, it does not mean these products are safe or ‘FDA approved.’”

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Dr Lynne Dawkins completed her PhD in 2001 and postdoctoral studies in 2006 at Goldsmiths, University of London before taking up a senior lectureship in 2006 and Readership in 2014 at the University of East London (UEL) where she co-ordinated the Drugs and Addictive Behaviours Research Group. [...] With over 20 years’ experience of working with smokers and, more recently, electronic cigarette users, Dr Dawkins is one of the UK’s leading authorities on e-cigarettes, having published papers on profiles of use, acute effects, puffing topographies and nicotine delivery.