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s2smodern

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is the U.S. government’s preeminent agency governing electronic communications, telephonic infrastructure, the internet, television, and radio.

This agency’s regulatory purview also covers digital and electronic advertisements for tobacco products. Citing this justification, Obama-era FCC commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel has voiced her concerns over e-cigarette advertisement and the so-called risks to youth who consume digital media.

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s2smodern

Hong Kong’s health minister likened the e-cigarette trend to an epidemic on Thursday, as she defended the government’s push to remove alternative cigarettes from the market, saying they posed new challenges to the authorities’ drive to deter teenagers from picking up smoking. While seeking to prohibit the sale and supply of such products, Secretary for Food and Health Sophia Chan Siu-chee said, the administration was not pushing for a complete ban, as it was not trying to punish the users themselves.

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s2smodern

The government’s war on e-cigarettes is simply bizarre – and that’s putting it nicely. Of all the unhealthy lifestyle choices available to – or forced upon – Hongkongers, why are e-cigarettes the only item being targeted? The biggest beneficiaries of the ban, traditional tobacco companies that have not invested in researching and developing new alternatives, can now laugh all the way to the bank.

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s2smodern

Nearly every authority agrees; we are in the midst of a public health epidemic.

In November, the American Medical Association, representing the nation’s physicians, called on the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to take action against the “urgent public health epidemic” of skyrocketing e-cigarette use.

 

In early December, then-Senator Hatch (R-UT) introduced the Smoke Free Schools Act, which — among other measures — called on the FDA [...] to discourage e-cigarette use among students and to study gaps in knowledge of the harms of e-cigarettes on youth, [...]

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s2smodern

New regulations will allow the legal sale of e-cigarettes and vaping devices in the UAE for the first time.

Manufacturers will be allowed to sell the battery-powered products as long as they meet new standards and carry health warnings similar to traditional cigarettes.

The Emirates Authority for Standardisation and Metrology confirmed the move on Sunday. The new rules - known as UAE.S 5030 - allow the sale of electronic cigarettes, electronic pipes, electronic shisha devices plus the liquid refills.

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s2smodern

‘A lot of people still think e-cigarettes are not harmful,” U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams said last week. “But studies show that nicotine is, pound for pound, as addictive as heroin.” Dr. Adams, speaking to the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, was making an appeal to fear, not science. Drug consumption is measured by the dosage, not the pound.
More fundamentally, the concept of “addictiveness” is so vague that it can easily be manipulated. There isn’t a single agreed-upon scientific definition. [...]

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s2smodern

It’s incredible the things that have changed for the vaping industry over the last couple of years, and the things that have stayed just the same. One of the most common problems facing the vaping industry is the lack of understanding among the general public to the harm reduction and smoking cessation value they offer. At first, it was forgivable for so many to not know, but with the massive pile of evidence we now have, it’s a shame so many public health institutions still undermine the value of vaping. [...]

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s2smodern

Do electronic cigarettes cause less harm than smoking, and will they help me quit?

These are the key questions that people who smoke but wish to quit raise with their healthcare professionals.

They are also hot topics in the ongoing debate about the potential benefits and harms of e-cigarettes and their regulation. The authors of the new review, who work at Aberdeen Royal Infirmary in the United Kingdom, say that their aim is to inform this discussion.

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s2smodern

As Arizona and other states consider legislation to limit the sale and use of e-cigarettes, researchers at the University of Arizona and elsewhere are urging caution regarding the potential danger of secondhand vapor from the devices.

E-cigarettes are often touted as a safer alternative to regular cigarettes. But studies show that the vapor released by e-cig users is not “just water,” as e-cigarette companies advertise.

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s2smodern

In 2018, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) released a report that examined the relationship between e-cigarette use and traditional, combustible cigarette use among young people. Essentially, the findings of the report supported the argument that e-cigarettes function as a gateway to combustible cigarette use. However, such a conclusion is contradicted by long-term population trends, which show that the rate of smoking is decreasing as the rate of vaping increases, an observation noted in the NASEM report.

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s2smodern

Survey results published this week indicate that cigarette smoking was about as common among high school students last year as it was in 2017. Is this evidence that the surge in adolescent vaping is finally reversing the decline in adolescent smoking that began in the late 1990s? Probably not.

In the 2018 National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS), [...] 8.1 percent of high school seniors reported smoking cigarettes in the previous month, compared to 7.6 percent in 2017. The difference was not statistically significant. [...]

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s2smodern

Late last year, public health officials in Philadelphia—which ranks second among large cities hit hardest by the US overdose and drug poisoning death crisis—announced a ban on residents of publicly funded addiction treatment programs going outside to smoke cigarettes, effective January 1, 2019. People in Philadelphia who are living with a substance use disorder and seeking publicly funded inpatient treatment now face an ultimatum: Either commit to going without smoking or do not enter treatment.

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s2smodern

As a relatively new device, it’s not uncommon for vaporizers to receive a lot of scrutiny from public health institutions over their overall risk and impact, especially on teens. But while a growing pile of evidence indicates vaping is an extremely powerful smoking cessation and harm reduction tool, it’s had little impact on how much heat e-cigarettes get from the FDA. Things have been ramping up in the battle over vaping for the last couple of years, but it seems to be coming to a head as Commissioner Gottlieb continues his crusade against the vaping industry. [...]

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s2smodern

[...] a new study from Stanford University suggests Juul's 59 mg/mL (5.9% by volume) nicotine products may have lead other e-cigarette companies to increase their nicotine content, starting a "nicotine arms race."

"Following Juul's lead, many purveyors of nicotine salt-based e-liquids offer nicotine concentrations at the 5%, 6%, and even 7% [per volume] level," Dr. Robert Jackler, lead author of the study and a professor of head and neck surgery at Stanford University, wrote.

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s2smodern

Smokers need all the help they can get to quit cigarettes. New research reported in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine confirms that e-cigarettes are significantly more effective than FDA-approved nicotine medicines in helping smokers end their deadly habit.

 

This study is impressive proof of the scientific concept known as tobacco harm-reduction: the substitution of vastly safer smoke-free tobacco products like e-cigarettes and smokeless tobacco by smokers who are unable or unwilling to become nicotine and tobacco abstinent.

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s2smodern

In his speech at a recent Health Promotion Board roadshow, Amrin Amin, Senior Parliamentary Secretary for Health and Home Affairs, made it very clear that the Singapore government needs to ensure that the public and the young know the reasons for the ban on electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes).

The Sembawang GRC Member of Parliament noted, however, that if there is good, sound evidence about using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation aid, the government is willing to study it.

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s2smodern

Over 300 million people in India regularly use tobacco products, with a third using cigarette-type products and twice as many using oral tobacco. The use of these products causes over 1 million premature deaths annually in the country, and as the population and disposable income increases, this toll can be expected to worsen significantly.

It’s is a public health catastrophe, and for many people the story ends there. [...]

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s2smodern

While this study contributes to literature on the potential value of e-cigarettes as smoking-cessation devices, it does not address the public health threat of flavored e-cigarettes marketed toward youths.

In New York City, 17 percent of public high school students reported using e-cigarettes versus only 2 percent of adults. E-cigarettes, more often than not, contain nicotine, which is extremely addictive, and adolescents may be more susceptible to developing nicotine dependence than adults.

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s2smodern

The annual Public Health England SmokeFree Health Harms campaign, now in its seventh year, focuses on the toxins present in cigarette smoke and their harmful effects on the body. A novel feature this year is emphasis on the relative safety of e-cigarettes compared with smoking. A video shows sticky yellow black sludge appearing after a few packets of cigarettes are smoked through a simulator. The same noxious material is being deposited in the lungs of smokers and the shock value of the “jar of tar” is a familiar tool. 

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s2smodern

The CDC is one of the finest public health institutions on the planet. Because they fearlessly march into "hot zones" to battle deadly infectious diseases, we microbiologists think of the good folks at the CDC as real-life superheroes. [...] The CDC has also gone on a bizarre crusade against e-cigarettes. True, vaping is not completely safe, and it should only be used by smokers as a quitting device. Recreational use should be discouraged, and policies should be in place to prevent them from falling into the hands of teenagers. [...]