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People who felt distressed and lonely during the country's lockdown last autumn were three times more likely to smoke more, a new study has found. Dr Every-Palmer said people who felt lonely or isolated almost all the time were more than three times more likely to increase their cigarette intake than those who were never lonely. "This finding was not related to whether people lived alone or with others, which suggests living alone is not necessarily the same as being lonely," she said. "Future pandemic planning could also examine how people can retain feelings of connection."