Commentary

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s2smodern

Nicotine Science & Policy | 24 December 2014

Year 2014 was a second year of life for „Nicotine Science and Policy” website, which first went live in September 2013. End of the year is a good time to summarise and to look back at what has been happening during the last twelve months.

 

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s2smodern

Lou Ritter | 31 October 2014 • GUEST BLOG •

The E-Research Foundation (ERF) is a non-profit foundation designed to be a collective funding portal. As such, ERF will provide financial assistance to researchers seeking to advance independent peer-reviewed and published scientific research focused on electronic vapor products (electronic cigarettes) and their use. ERF is seeking 501(c)(3) status.

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s2smodern

Nicotine Science & Policy | 10 October 2014

This meeting is the Sixth Conference of the Parties (COP-6) to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). This convention is WHO’s primary instrument for addressing the health impact of tobacco use internationally. This briefing provides information on discussions about electronic cigarettes and background documentation.

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s2smodern

Clive Bates | 14 September 2014

A new paper is published today: WHO position on ENDS: a critique of the use of science and communication of risk (PDF) written and researched by Clive Bates at Counterfactual
 
We have grown accustomed to WHO and the FCTC Secretariat taking a negative approach to tobacco harm reduction - seeing only risks and threats, and little of the real world potential, while covertly planning an offensive against e-cigarettes through the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Yet the evidence is steadily moving against that position, leaving WHO looking more extreme, unscientific and ideologically motivated as the data accumulates.
 

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s2smodern

Neil McKeganey | 27 August 2014

Have health professionals started a new moral panic over e-cigarettes? Neil McKeganey thinks they have.

There are few things more powerful than the narrative of fear. The concern that something may be harming us in ways that we might have been unaware, and that action should be taken to limit its occurrence, is a foundational tablet of interventionist public policy. The narrative of fear can be equally strong when it comes to new items that emerge in our social world and about which we know relatively little.

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s2smodern

Gerry Stimson* | 26 August 2014

WHO’s mission is to save lives and prevent disease but once again it is exaggerating the risks of e-cigarettes, while downplaying the huge potential of these non-combustible low risk nicotine products to end the epidemic of tobacco related disease. WHO claims e-cigarettes are a threat to public health, but this statement has no evidence to support it, and ignores the large number of people who are using them to cut down or quit smoking completely
 
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s2smodern

Nicotine Science & Policy | 22 August 2014

The European vaper organisation – European Vapers United Network – has added its voice to the growing concern about the possible WHO position on electronic cigarettes.

 

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s2smodern

Nicotine Science & Policy | 20 August 2014

A legal challenge against the EU Tobacco Products Directive has been launched by UK e-cigarette manufacturer Totally Wicked. The first step will be to ask for the British court to rule whether a case can be taken to the European court.

 

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s2smodern

Nicotine Science & Policy | 18 August 2014

The Italian Ministry of Economy and Finance is currently considering a new decree that will tax e-cigarettes and drive up their costs, making them less financially attractive for users, and damaging the e-cigarette market. 

 

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Michael R. Hufford & Gilbert Ross | 3 August 2014

Today approximately 14,000 people will die of tobacco-related diseases around the world. The same thing will happen tomorrow and the day after that, leaving nearly 6 million dead in the coming year. Despite this public health disaster, the uncomfortable truth is that mind-altering drugs, from alcohol to nicotine to caffeine, are here to stay. When it comes to smoking, our addiction has proven too much to overcome:

  • too strong at the individual level, by the smoker who will fail 95% of the time in their attempts to quit;
  • too strong at governmental levels, who have grown too dependent on cigarette taxes and Master Settlement transfer payments to responsibly consider public health; and
  • too strong at the societal level, by investors’ addiction to tobacco companies’ profits and their reliable dividends.